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In Climate Talks, Spotlight Turns to India

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U.S.-China deal on carbon emissions ramps up pressure on New Delhi to get more aggressive in moving away from coal. 

India’s new prime minister, a Hindu nationalist and former tea seller, recently urged his country’s schoolchildren to help save the planet by relishing the delight of a full moon.

“On a full moon night, if street lights are put off for two, three hours, will it not be service to the environment? Won’t you enjoy the full moon night?” Narendra Modi said in September, adding: “We have forgotten to live with nature.” He urged kids to switch off fans, lights, or appliances when not in use and turn off tap water when brushing teeth.

Modi, 64, has sounded at times like a climate activist. “Al Gore was right when he commented a few years ago that it was inconvenient to many leaders to hear, face and accept the naked truth of global warming,” Modi wrote in a 2011 e-book, Convenient Action,which heralded his climate efforts while chief minister of the western state of Gujarat.

So as a new round of international climate talks launches Monday in Lima, Peru, what role will Modi’s government play? The United Nations meeting will focus on a new global accord, slated to be finalized next year in Paris, to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions linked to global warming. (See related map: “Four Ways to Look at Global Carbon Footprints.”) Read more

Courtesy: news.nationalgeographic.com

1000MW ( 2X500 MW) stage I of Mouda Super Thermal Power Project in Nagpur district of Maharashtra

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The Prime Minister said that even so many years after independence, power had not reached every nook and corner of the country, and in many areas there were acute power shortages. But he reiterated his Government`s resolve to provide power to all. The Prime Minister mentioned the stress he had laid on hydropower during his recent visits to Bhutan and Nepal, as well as to the state of Jammu and Kashmir. He said the aim of the Government is to tap all sources of energy, with emphasis on clean energy, especially solar energy.

The Prime Minister said that even so many years after independence, power had not reached every nook and corner of the country, and in many areas there were acute power shortages. But he reiterated his Government`s resolve to provide power to all. The Prime Minister mentioned the stress he had laid on hydropower during his recent visits to Bhutan and Nepal, as well as to the state of Jammu and Kashmir. He said the aim of the Government is to tap all sources of energy, with emphasis on clean energy, especially solar energy. Read More..

Courtesy: PTI

कानून में खोट, कैसे हो माफिया पर चोट

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खनन में नहीं दर्ज हो सकता आपराधिक मुकदमा, केवल अर्थदंड लगाने का ही प्रावधान

अवैध खनन को लेकर शासन और प्रशासन मे रोज चर्चा हो रही है कि किस कदर अवैध खनन का कारोबार फलता फूलता जा रहा है। और सरकार इसे रोकने मे नाकाम रही है। मसलन, इस पर रोक क्यों नहीं लग पा रही है? दोषी जेल में क्यों नहीं हैं? तमाम दावों-वादों के बावजूद प्रशासन लाचार क्यों नजर आता है? सरकार इस पर प्रभावी रोक लगाने के लिए हर दिन दावे करती है लेकिन कुछ नहीं हो पा रहा। हर रोज रेत-बजरी से लदे वाहन पकड़े जाते हैं और अर्थदंड देकर छूट जाते हैं। खनन माफिया शासन-प्रशासन की प्रणाली को ठेंगे पर रखते नजर आ रहे हैं। अब इसका मामला संसद मे भी सुनाई देने लगा है। हरिद्वार से सांसद एवं पूर्व मुख्यमंत्री रमेश पोखरियाल निशंक ने यह मामला उठाया। उन्होंने दून घाटी, हरिद्वार, देहरादून, ऊधमसिंह नगर व टिहरी और गंगा, यमुना में बड़े पैमाने पर अवैध खनन की बात कही। उन्होने सरकार को अवगत कराया कि अवैध खनन से पर्यावरण एवं जलवायु पर भी प्रतिकूल असर पड़ रहा है। जो आज हमारे सेम दिखाई दे रहा है। अवैध खनन मे लिप्त लोगों के खिलाफ सख्त से सख्त कार्यवाही होनी चाहिए। निशंक के जवाब में केंद्रीय पर्यावरण मंत्री प्रकाश जावडे़कर ने उत्तराखंड में विशेष दल भेजकर स्थिति का जायजा लेने का आश्वासन दिया। विस्तार से देखें।

Himachal villagers turn eco activists to save Sutlej as residents reject state hydro-power report and conduct own survey

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The cumulative effect on the communities and the environment are still not recognized by these EIA preparing companies. The volume of destruction these power projects can cause, is still not studied. Hence it is an effort towards the environmental and social aspect to have a cumulative impact assesment on the upper satluj basin in Himachal Pradesh.

for details click here

Courtesy: mail online india

Climate change hits bamboo production in India

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Changing rainfall patterns are slashing bamboo production in northeast India, leading to losses of jobs and businesses.

Erratic rainfall and dry spells have led bamboo to flower more frequently, then die back afterward, local people say. That has hurt families who are dependent on the grass for their livelihoods and even for food.

Savita Datta, 37, a former bamboo artisan from Unakoti district in India’s Tripura state, once split bamboo into sticks to supply incense factories. She and her husband earned a profit of 15,000 to 20,000 rupees ($240 to $320) every month, she said.

But starting in 2007 bamboo growers began reporting a record drop in production. As the supply of raw material fell, prices began to rise, climbing from about 15 rupees ($0.25) per bamboo cane to as much as 50 rupees ($0.80).

After struggling for a year, Savita and Ramapada finally had to shut down their business. She now works as a domestic servant and he pulls a rickshaw for a living.

“Some farmers said that all their bamboo plants had died because of sudden flowering, while others said that their bamboo shoots were not growing well due to heat and excessive rain,” Savita recalls

Amol Dutta, a manager at People’s Cooperative Society, a state government initiative that promotes rural entrepreneurs, estimates that at least 18 bamboo-stick-making units have closed in the past five years in North Tripura district alone. Those still in business have either moved their base elsewhere or are planning to do so.

Anuj Chakravarty, a resident of Emrapasa village in North Tripura, has been selling bamboo furniture for the past 20 years.  Last year he relocated his business to Mumbai.

“A thousand bamboos (bought at bulk rate) now cost over 4,000 rupees, which is more than triple the price we paid even five or six years ago. At this rate, we can’t run a business. So we decided to move out,” he said.

Besides offering a bigger clientele, Mumbai has another attraction, says Chakravarty: cheaper bamboo imported from China.

“Local suppliers gave us more varieties in raw material and design,” he admits. “With Chinese bamboos, you don’t get that. But they are two or three times cheaper.” Read more

Courtesy: eco-business.com

‘People must protect themselves from impact of climate change’

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Climate experts, who took part in a two-day workshop here, on Thursday opined that changes in governance and planning processes, and a greater sense of ownership among local bodies to incorporate climate adaptation perspectives are essential.

“The crucial role of science in helping cities understand the impact of climate change is unquestioned.

“However, the accuracy of scientific predictions is dependent on the quality of local data. As a result, scientists might not always be able to give definite answers,” said Professor Javier from the University of the Philippines.

During the workshop, communication emerged as one of the main gaps and, at the same time, one of the main drivers of a proper adaptation strategy.

“Our islands are threatened by rise in sea level. We need to educate our people and make them aware of how they can protect themselves from climate change impacts,” said Male City Mayor Maizan Ali Manik.

The need for greater communication between all main stakeholders, particularly between science and policy was echoed by Shimla Deputy Mayor Tikendar Panwar, when he said: “A much closer relationship between climate social scientists and urban planners is needed so that urban and economic development takes into account upcoming climate changes.”

The workshop was organised as a part of “Asian Cities Adapt: Impact of climate change in target cities in India and the Philippines and local adaptation strategies”, a project by ICLEI  with the support of  Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Government of Germany, through their international climate initiative.

The recommendations and suggestions by experts based on the project will be complied by mid-November.

Courtesy: The New Indian Express

Lessons on adapting to climate change

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Representatives from 20 cities from across South Asia will come together in Kochi on Wednesday to learn from each other on the issue of adaptation to climate change at the seminar on Asian Cities Adapt: Learning Exchange, co-organised by ICLEI South Asia and Kochi Corporation.

The two-day workshop, will present an impressive line-up of high-level local representatives from India, the Philippines, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Nepal, who will discuss solutions on how cities can adapt to climate change, together with climate experts and other practitioners from India, Southeast Asia and Europe. The civic representatives from other cities include Male city (Maldives) Mayor Maizan Ali Manik, Mongla Mayor Zulfikar Ali, and Singra (Bangladesh) Mayor Shamim Al Razi, and Shimla Deputy Mayor Tikender S Panwar.

“With the recently released fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment confirming that climate change is a reality and an increase in temperature and sea-level is therefore unavoidable, cities in Asia – one of the regions most vulnerable to climate change – must act, and must do so fast,” warn experts.

According to them, many cities attending the workshop have already witnessed the impact of changing weather patterns – the workshop will provide them with lessons and other approaches and experiences to understand consequences and identify suitable local responses better.

“Researchers from internationally-renowned institutions as well as expert agencies like German Cooperation Agency (GIZ ), Cities Development Initiatives for Asia (CDIA) and BBC Media Action will offer different perspectives on the issue, presenting the latest research findings and current initiatives at the seminar,” according to a release.

The workshop is organised as part of the ‘AsianCitiesAdapt – Impacts of Climate Change in Target Cities in India and the Philippines and Local Adaptation Strategies’.

The project was launched to formulate policy and practice to help four cities in India, including Howrah, Madurai, Visakhapatnam and Kochi and four cities in the Philippines like Baguio, Dagupan, San Fernando, Tuguegarao to take the first steps towards developing an appropriate adaptation strategy.

The project was implemented with the support from the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Government of Germany, through their International Climate Initiative.

Courtesy: The New Indian Express

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